PR Peeps Poll: Advertising Equivalencies? Say what? 32% Don’t Know What it Means

The July Business Wire PR Peeps poll is in and results reflect an apparent generation gap.  Regarding advertising equivalencies, the controversial method of justifying public relations efforts by equating publicity scored with what that attention would have cost were it paid for as advertising, almost 32% of 411 polled were not even familiar with the concept.

An almost equal number, 33%, professed that, yes, indeed they had used advertising equivalencies in the past.   Almost 24% said they had never used them and 11.4% claimed they “used to, but don’t anymore.”

Advertising equivalencies continue to dog PR pros vexed by bosses and clients insisting, understandably, that PR efforts be justified.  In his blog post, “Advertising Equivalencies Hangin’ Around Like a Bad Smell,” Alan Chumley, Director of Communications Research, Leger Marketing, does a great job capturing the issues associated with advertising equivalencies, such as their tendency to trivialize public relations and the fact that they are not endorsed by a single professional public relations organization.  He also offers four suggestions for what to do INSTEAD of advertising equivalencies.  Check it out.  

Meanwhile, here’s the details from our 411 respondents, culled from Twitter and our webinar polls.

julypoll

Business Wire PR Peeps Poll for July 2009          

Have you ever used advertising equivalencies to justify PR efforts?

  • 136  said YES-33%
  • 98    said  NO-23.8%
  • 47    said USED TO, BUT DON’T ANYMORE-11.4%
  • 130 said DON’T KNOW WHAT AD EQUIVALENCIES ARE-31.6%

To those who participated, thanks for taking the poll.   And, how about helping with the August Business Wire PR Peeps Poll?  When mistakes happen in a press release, do you care who’s at fault? Please let us know.

411 respondents via Twitter and Business Wire webinar polls.  Poll conducted  July 1 – 31, 2009.

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