Richmond Media Discuss Role of Press Releases and Offer Timing and Pitching Tips

March 23, 2011

by Cecile Oreste, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/DC

Business Wire hosted a Meet the Richmond Media event recently at the Ramada Plaza West in Richmond, Va. More than 50 public relations and communications professionals were in attendance to hear from a media panel discussion moderated by Business Wire client Jon Newman of The Hodges Partnership. The panel included:

–         Scott Bass, News Editor at Style Weekly

–         Rachel DePompa, Richmond Reporter at NBC12

–         Gregory Gilligan, Business Editor at the Richmond Times-Dispatch

–         Susan Winiecki, Editor in Chief and Associate Publisher of Richmond Magazine

Photo by Michael Toner/Business Wire

In addition to talking about news gathering techniques and tools, the panel discussed the role of press releases in the news industry, new technologies and how they have affected journalism, and current topics of interest in Richmond. Here are some tips and takeaways from the discussion:

1)      Personalize your pitch – According to Scott Bass of Style Weekly, e-mails that include “For Immediate Release” are immediately deleted. Tailor your pitch to help cut through the clutter. A great way to engage a reporter is to reference a previous article. He also recommends including contact names, phone numbers and availability for multiple sources in your press release.

2)      Be cognizant of deadlines – Reporters are filing stories at the end of the day so don’t call late in the afternoon, said Gregory Gilligan of the Richmond Times-Dispatch. He suggests trying them early morning and also including bullet points of key information in your press release.

3)      Develop a relationship – According to Susan Winiecki of Richmond Magazine, press releases are only the start of the conversation. Schedule meetings to learn about the publication and its editorial calendar, and also to inform reporters about your clients.

4)      Think about the visuals – Broadcast reporters need time to create visuals for their stories, said Rachel DePompa of NBC12. Give at least a day’s notice for events if you want to be covered. Also leave time after press conferences for reporters to conduct interviews. They need original sound bites for their coverage.

Business Wire Senior Account Executive Michael Toner also compiled a recap of the event that includes audience and panelist tweets. To see the story, click here.

Business Wire holds dozens of local events every year. We bring local media members and industry thought leaders to your market to discuss today’s most relevant topics, from trends in today’s newsrooms to writing for SEO. Events are usually free of charge to members. For more upcoming local Business Wire events or to see what’s coming up in our award-winning webinar series, visit BusinessWire.com. Follow live updates from Business Wire events on Twitter: hash tag #bwevents


Dos and Don’ts of Pitching a Features Editor

March 8, 2011
by Cecile Oreste, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/DC

Business Wire’s Features National circuit and Feature Topic Series can help distribute your press releases, but how do you create an effective story that will appeal to a features editor? I reached out to Katie Aberbach of the Washington Post Express and Katy De Luca of the Washington Examiner to find out the dos and don’ts of pitching a feature editor.

Katie Aberbach

Katie Aberbach is a feature editor for the Washington Post Express‘ Lookout, Weekend Pass and Digs sections. According to Aberbach, a good feature is “a human interest story, something the average reader can relate to.” The best feature stories are when you become invested in what you’re reading or when you can tell that the reporter truly enjoys what he or she is writing about. When it comes to getting ideas for feature stories, “press releases do help out a lot because there is no way you can know everything new that’s coming out,” she said. “Tell me about your new product, television show and book and offer a source to comment on it.”

When it comes to writing your press release, she suggests the following:

  • Do break up the story and summarize key information into bullet points.
  • Do include links to other trend stories and think of what visuals would work for your story.
  • Don’t forget the hook. Even though you’re pitching a feature story, a hard news hook is still valuable. Say why I should care right away. Naming the names is really important.

Katy De Luca

Katy De Luca is the features editor of the Washington Examiner. For De Luca, the best feature stories are ones that appeal to the Examiner audience. “I look at all pitches and think about what will be most interesting to our readers. I think about what they would want to read and what is the best way to get the information to them,” she said. Most of the story ideas come from the writers De Luca works with. She also reads a variety of media and if a topic grabs her attention, she’ll forward the lead to one of her freelancers.

When pitching a feature reporter or editor, De Luca recommends these points:

  • Do include as much information as possible in the subject line and personalize your pitch. Provide all basic details. Simple is better.
  • Do periodically ask the person you are pitching to what sort of things they are looking for. Communication is a key part of the process.
  • Don’t send long-winded e-mails with attachments.

For more suggestions on how to help get your feature news noticed by the media, check out these Features News Tips. You can also contact our features department at features@businesswire.com for additional writing tips and story suggestions.


Philadelphia Business Editors Discuss Changes in the Newsroom, Useful Pitching Tips

December 15, 2010

By: Cecile Oreste, Media Relations Specialist/DC

Business Wire/Philadelphia hosted a “Meet the Editors” event on Tuesday, December 7th. The panel discussion, moderated by Cecile Oreste of Business Wire, featured Craig Ey, Editor of the Philadelphia Business Journal, and Brian Toolan, Business Editor of The Philadelphia Inquirer. More than 60 public relations and communications professionals attended the event at the Union League of Philadelphia. Attendees contributed to the conversation in a question and answer section and also by live tweeting the event using the #BWEvents hash tag.

Brian Toolan, Business Editor, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Unique Angle

Ey and Toolan started the discussion by defining what makes their publications unique. Ey pointed out that the Business Journal finds story angles that would appeal to small- and medium-sized business owners. Their readership comes from selling their expertise and the long tenure of their reporting staff. Toolan of the Inquirer said the paper prides itself in providing exclusive information with real consequence. He pointed out that there is a lot of money left on the table for any story. It just depends on how curious you are as a reporter.

Role of Social Media

Both editors said there is still much to learn about social media and its role in the newsroom, but agreed that the tools are useful for monitoring trends and confirming information with sources. These resources can serve as an early warning about what is happening in a particular industry and also be the first alert for breaking news.

Looking to the Future

In regards to the future of their respective media outlets, Ey talked about the importance of attracting younger readers and changing the perception of the publication so it’s not “your daddy’s paper.” He discussed the editorial decision to include more stories about restaurants and retail, two topics that seem to appeal to a younger demographic. For the Inquirer, creating a successful business model for online news is imperative to the publication’s growth. Toolan mentioned mobile technologies and apps as playing an integral part in this process.

Craig Ey, Editor, Philadelphia Business Journal

Pitching Advice

In addition, Toolan and Ey provided useful pitching and media relations tips. Toolan stressed the need for releases to be newsworthy. Think about what the story means for the readership of the paper and make sure it includes fresh and interesting information. Ey mentioned the Seven Principles for Business Journal Reporters which public relations professionals can take into consideration when writing their press releases. The tips are paraphrased below:

1)      Answer the questions: So what? Who cares?

2)      Write and edit short.

3)      Think about visuals for every story.

4)      Dig up news.

5)      Identify the money element in every story.

6)      Provide solid news so readers can more effectively run their businesses.

7)      We cover business. Exclusively.

For more upcoming local Business Wire events or to see what’s coming up in our award-winning webinar series, visit http://www.businesswire.com/portal/site/home/business-wire-events.

Follow Business Wire events on Twitter! Hash tag #bwevents


Capitol Communicator’s Meet the New Media Event Recap

November 22, 2010

By: Cecile Oreste, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/DC

On Tuesday, November 16th, public relations professionals and other members of the communications industry gathered at B. Smith’s in Washington, DC for Capitol Communicator’s “Meet the New Media” event. The media panel, moderated by Mopwater PR founder Amanda Miller Littlejohn, included:

Several attendees were live tweeting the event. To follow the discussion and to add to the conversation, look for tweets with the hashtag #NewMediaDC in Twitter Search.

After providing a brief overview of their respective media outlets, each panelist contributed their thoughts on a variety of topics: social media and journalism, do’s and don’ts of pitching and the impact of mobile devices among others. The main takeaways from the discussion were the importance of building relationships with reporters and knowing the publication you’re pitching.

In regards to relationship building, Jennifer Nycz-Conner of the Washington Business Journal said she has developed professional relationships through Twitter. At times, it’s actually faster to reach her through Twitter rather than traditional forms of communication like e-mail or phone. She also joked that the newsroom has officially started the tally of news releases starting with “It’s that time of year again.” She suggested finding a different lead unless you want to be grouped with the others.

Michael Schaffer of Washington City Paper said that we date ourselves by asking how journalists use social media in their news gathering. He added that reporters will more than likely take advantage of these tools unless they’re not curious at all. When it comes to pitching the Washington City Paper, he suggests reaching out to individual journalists rather than going straight for the editor. “It’s a better percentage game working the reporters,” he said.

According to Erik Wemple of TBD, the media outlet was founded on social media responsiveness. Mandy Jenkins, the site’s Social Media Producer, not only engages the community through Facebook and Twitter, but also monitors these social media networks looking for trends and news tips. Wemple recommends starting your e-mail pitch with a reference to a story the journalist has written. This shows you read the publication and have some knowledge of what the reporter writes about.

Dion Haynes of Capital Business echoed Wemple’s point noting that a reference to one of his stories in a recent pitch caught his attention. For Haynes, it’s not only important to get to know the publication, but also to learn about the person you are pitching. Journalists are people too. They have their own personal lives and interests, he said.

Edwin Warfield of Citybizlist talked about the reciprocal relationship between public relations and journalism. According to Warfield, Citybizlist will take any news release that is local, literate and about business. Gathering information from a multitude of sources is important to carry out Citybizlist’s mission of delivering breaking local news.

Capitol Communicator serves as a resource to the communications community of the Mid-Atlantic region. In addition to providing industry news, Capitol Communicator provides professional development opportunities and educational events. For more information about Capitol Communicator, please visit www.capitolcommunicator.com.


Online News Association 2010 Conference Recap

November 8, 2010

By: Cecile Oreste, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/DC

Business Wire Media Relations Specialist Cecile Oreste was among the 1,200 media professionals in attendance at the Online News Association (ONA) 2010 Conference in Washington, DC. Online journalists, educators and students from around the country came to the Renaissance Washington, DC Downtown Hotel Thursday, October 28th through Saturday, October 30th to learn from leaders in the industry, including AOL and NPR among others.

The four day conference started on Thursday with a variety of hands-on workshops including photography, video and audio field trips that shared best practices and techniques. ONA also organized a career summit and job fair featuring recruiters from American Public Media, Associated Press, Bloomberg Government, Gannett and Mashable. Yahoo! News sponsored the opening night reception at The Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art and Portraiture, where attendees took in some local culture in between appetizers and drinks.

TBD, Washington’s hyperlocal news source, started off Friday morning with their keynote session, “Starting from Scratch.” Laura McGann, Assistant Editor at the Nieman Journalism Lab, moderated the discussion between General Manager Jim Brady, Social Media Producer Mandy Jenkins, Director of Community Engagement Steve Buttry and TBD Editor Erik Wemple. During the keynote event, McGann questioned Wemple’s decision to devote prime real estate to TBD.com’s feature “The List.” Wemple’s response generated several tweets and also lots of laughs. He suggested that if you don’t have something terrible on your site, then you’re not trying hard enough. You have to fail many times before you get it right, he said.

Saturday’s sessions began with a keynote discussion about Wikileaks and also featured a lunch with Knight News Challenge winners. Other Saturday sessions included “Turning Bits into Bucks,” which discussed entrepreneurial journalism; and “Ten Tech Trends in ’10” with Amy Webb, CEO of Webbmedia Group, an international digital media consulting firm that advises companies on emerging technology. In addition, Webb is on the Board of Directors for ONA and will serve as Chair of the association’s new Advisory Board.

Some of the trends Webb discussed during her session included the 2011 tablets coming to market and mobile image scanning (QR codes). According to Webb, these two topics, along with open source technology and design, were major themes throughout the conference. “Lots of journalists are eager to use web tools to enhance the work they do, and there were many opportunities this year to learn all about the latest offerings,” she said.

Tanja Aitamurto, Innovation Journalism Fellow at Stanford and blogger for The Huffington Post, said the conference provided insight on new production and business models in journalism, and also introduced the idea of journalism as only one of many products media organizations offer. She brought up a positive message presented by Evan Smith of the Texas Tribune during the “Fund My Media 2.0” session on Thursday. According to Smith, there is still need for high-quality journalism; and where there is demand, there will be ways to produce and fund it. Aitamurto also added that in order for journalism to succeed in the future, “innovation, open mindedness and experiments are very much needed.”

The conference concluded Saturday night with the Online Journalism Awards Banquet. Hari Sreenivasan of PBS NewsHour brought the laughs as the master of ceremonies while MSNBC.com, NPR, ProPublica and CNN.com took home top honors.

Overall, the conference was a great opportunity to learn from and network with online journalism professionals. It also maintained a positive outlook on the future of journalism during a time when news organizations face a number of challenges. For more information about the Online News Association, please visit their website at www.journalists.org.


New Client Success Story: Taxi Magic

October 28, 2010

by Cecile Oreste, Media Relations Specialist/DC

Taxi Magic is revolutionizing the taxi industry through innovative technology products. The company is part of Alexandria, Va. based RideCharge Inc., which started operations in February 2007. Although Taxi Magic has been around for a few years, this is the company’s first time using Business Wire to distribute its news.

Only two days after sending a news release about its new Passenger Information Monitor (PIM), Taxi Magic was featured on “Washington Business Tonight,” a program aired on local television station TBD-TV. The segment featured an interview with Taxi Magic President Sanders Partee and was later posted on the network’s corresponding website, TBD.com, where visitors could easily share the story through social media networks like Twitter and Facebook.

According to Jay McClary, Vice President of Marketing for Taxi Magic, the release focused on the idea of innovation as well as the convenience that comes from using Taxi Magic products. “We are really trying to improve the taxi experience for passengers, and that seemed to resonate with the TBD reporter,” he said.

The Taxi Magic success story shows that a quality release goes a long way. Jay gave TBD-TV a reason to read beyond the dateline and was readily available when the reporter called him about the release. Do you have a success story you want to share with Business Wire? If so, contact media.relations@businesswire.com.

Taxi Magic Release – http://bizwire.pr/zwPsh

TBD-TV Coverage – http://www.tbd.com/articles/2010/10/taxi-magic-will-give-d-c-cab-riders-new-options-for-entertainment-payment-methods-18783.html


DC-Area Tech Journalists Offer Pitching Tips

October 1, 2010

by Cecile Oreste, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/DC

Business Wire/DC hosted a “Meet the Technology Media” Event at Marriott Tysons Corner in Vienna, Virginia on Wednesday, September 29th.  The panel discussion, moderated by Cecile Oreste, Media Relations Specialist, featured five technology journalists from some of the area’s top media outlets:

About 120 public relations and communications professionals were in attendance to learn how to increase your organization’s chances of securing media coverage. Attendees joined in the conversation during a question and answer section and also by live tweeting the event using the #BWEvents hash tag.

Here are some of the key points from the panel discussion:

  1. Headlines are important. Nick Wakeman said to think about your press release headline as a headline in a newspaper. Just as media outlets compete for readers at the newsstand, public relations professionals must compete for the attention of journalists in their inbox. The headline should tell reporters why they should care. For The Hill, you should have a clear link to politics or policy issues, said Gautham Nagesh.
  2. Include your organization in the e-mail subject. Paul Sherman noted that e-mail subjects are key in a mobile environment. Rob Pegoraro added that including a client and product name in the e-mail subject makes it easier for him to find the message later on.
  3. Know who you’re pitching. Every journalist has his or her own preferences when it comes to being pitched. Paul Sherman noted that he prefers texts over voicemails. Nick Wakeman likes when you follow up your e-mail with a phone call. There is no secret formula to media relations. You just need to do your homework.
  4. Consider your audience. Bill Flook pointed out that the Washington Business Journal reaches two different audiences through its online and print editions. Think about how your story fits in and remember that exclusivity matters for print while immediacy is more important for the web.
  5. Go beyond the pitch. According to Gautham Nagesh, Twitter can be an effective way to generate interest. If his followers are interested in your message, he will be more inclined to pay attention. Rob Pegoraro noted that commenting on articles online is a great way to provide information that was not included in the story. Bill Flook suggests setting up informational interviews with your CEO. Often, meetings like these can result in story ideas.

For more upcoming local Business Wire events or to see what’s coming up in our award-winning webinar series, visit http://www.businesswire.com/portal/site/home/business-wire-events.


Recap: Asian American Journalists Association National Convention

August 19, 2010

— by Cecile Oreste, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/DC

Business Wire Media Relations Specialists Luis Guillen (LA) and Cecile Oreste (DC) attended the Asian American Journalists Association’s 21st Annual National Convention August 4-7 in Los Angeles.  More than 800 journalists and media professionals gathered at the Renaissance Hollywood Hotel to network and learn from leaders in the industry.

The four day convention, titled “Back to the Future” started off Wednesday, August 4th with an opening reception sponsored by Yahoo! at The Highlands Hollywood.  The event celebrated the founders of AAJA and other pioneers who paved the way for Asian American journalists.  One of the highlights of the night included an appearance by network television anchor Connie Chung.

According to Washington Post summer intern Machiko Yasuda, the opening reception was her favorite part of the convention.  “With the crazed atmosphere in most newsrooms right now dealing with budget cuts and layoffs, it can be hard to boost morale – but hearing about and talking to the Asian American reporters, photographers and editors around the country after WWII and beyond gave me a renewed sense of mission and community,” she said.

Thursday, August 5th and Friday, August 6th were filled with educational workshops covering various topics including the state of journalism, diversifying your coverage and digital know-how.  A career fair also offered attendees the opportunity to meet with editors and human resource executives from Gannett, the New York Times, CBS News and Google, among other media outlets.

Thomas Huang

Thomas Huang moderates a workshop at the AAJA convention

Melisa Goh, Weekend Online Producer for NPR and presenter for Friday’s session “Broadcast Meets Web,” found the workshops and convention in general extremely valuable as it gave her the opportunity to discuss the latest innovations and developments in journalism.  Sometimes you get lost in whatever today’s story is, but the convention gives you a chance to uproot from the daily grind, look at the big picture and come away with new ideas, she said.

Also on Friday, the Los Angeles Times, along with Union Bank, sponsored an off-site Media Access Workshop at the newspaper’s headquarters to discuss how to pitch stories.  The workshop presented a panel of journalists from around the country with Thomas Huang, Sunday and Enterprise Editor of The Dallas Morning News and Ethics and Diversity Fellow at The Poynter Institute, as moderator.

Many of the panelists, including San Diego 6 anchor Jenny Hamel, broadcast journalist Linda Takahashi and Los Angeles Times reporter My-Thuan Tran, talked about the importance of pitching a story that appeals to the consumer’s emotions.  They suggested creating a pitch that has a broader appeal, but can be told through the eyes of one person.

Victor Hernandez, Director of Domestic News Gathering for CNN, added that social media tools have provided a sense of empowerment for viewers and public relations professionals alike.  He gave the example of shooting video of an event and posting it on YouTube.com.  “We take notice of things that generate buzz,” he said.  “And we’ll jump on the bandwagon too.”

panelists

Panelists at the AAJA media access workshop

The convention concluded Saturday, August 7th with a gala scholarship and awards banquet with Laura Ling and Euna Lee as keynote speakers.  The two journalists made news last year when they were detained at the China-North Korea border while reporting on the trafficking of North Korean women.

Overall, the convention was both an inspiring and educational experience.  It not only provided an opportunity to network with fellow journalists, but also created a forum to discuss issues affecting Asian Americans in the industry.  According to Goh, it’s easy to forget that we belong to a smaller community with a voice that needs to be heard, but AAJA reminds us of this.  It helps establish a community outside of the workplace and explain our heritage to others, she said.

Next year’s annual convention is scheduled to take place in Detroit, Michigan.  For more information about the Asian American Journalists Association, please visit www.aaja.org.


What can Public Relations Professionals Learn from TBD.com?

August 9, 2010

by Cecile Oreste, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/DC

TBD.com, which launched today, is taking a unique approach to providing hyperlocal news.  Unlike AOL’s recently launched Patch.com, which hired reporters to cover local communities in California, New York and other states, TBD.com will partner with more than a hundred community blogs to provide the most comprehensive coverage of the DC Metro area.

TBD.com Homepage

TBD.com, a hyperlocal news site which launched today in Washington, DC

That’s not to say that TBD.com won’t have a reporting staff of its own.  The TBD.com editorial team is comprised of several journalists from a number of traditional media, including The Washington Post, as well as new media platforms like local blog DCist.com.  What makes TBD.com different from other competitors that are also looking to provide news down to the ZIP code is its willingness to admit that no one news outlet can cover it all.

“Aggregation will play an important role.  We’re not just producing content, but will be linking to traditional media outlets and our community of blogs when they have content we’re not covering,” said Jeff Sonderman, Senior Community Host of TBD.com. “We’re taking an approach that is almost the opposite of legacy media by not keeping the traffic all to ourselves.”

In addition, TBD.com plans to use an editorial style that mirrors the format of its community blogs, which cover news about a variety of topics including neighborhood issues, food, sports and entertainment.  “Our reporters will have more of a blogger mindset.  They’ll be focused on talking to a community of users, creating short dispatches, constantly updating stories and linking to other sources,” Sonderman said.

According to Sonderman, there are a number of reasons why the blog movement has developed as much as it has.  Blogs tend to engage readers with a more personal perspective versus traditional media which adhere to a specific formula.  Blogs are also infinitely customizable and can appeal to even the smallest group of readers.

Sonderman gave the example of Allergy Life in Loudoun – a blog about child food allergy issues, written by a mother raising a daughter with life-threatening allergies.  “You’re never going to find a reporter who covers allergies in Loudoun County,” he said.  “But there happens to be a blog for that niche audience.”

What can public relations professionals learn from TBD.com’s approach to hyperlocal news?  First, we take a lesson from TBD.com’s model of aggregation.  Although you can provide journalists with valuable information, you don’t have all the answers.  Providing resources or additional credible contacts can help build relationships with journalists.

Second, engage your reader.  Press releases don’t always have to follow the same format.  Write with voice, humor, wit and get a journalist’s attention by breaking through the clutter.

Finally, find your audience – even if it’s a community interested in a girl living with allergies.  Identify who you’re trying to reach and go where they are even if it’s a small publication or local blog.


Media Relations in the Digital Age Event Recap

July 15, 2010

by Cecile Oreste, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire DC

Members of the Business Wire/DC team were in attendance at Media Relations in the Digital Age held at the US Navy Memorial & Heritage Center on Wednesday, July 14th.  The event, which was organized by the Professional Development Committee of the PRSA – National Capital Chapter, welcomed four journalists – Ceci Connolly, Nancy Marshall-Genzer, Greg Ip and Jordan Rau – to discuss “how to fearlessly pitch big-league media and get big-time results.”

Ceci Connolly

Ceci Connolly

Ceci Connolly is the national health policy correspondent for the Washington Post.  She has been a staff writer at the Post for over a decade and has covered politics, health care and several major disasters.  Prior to joining the newspaper in 1997, she covered politics for Congressional Quarterly and worked at the Washington bureau of the St. Petersburg Times.

According to Ceci, public relations practitioners need to think strategically about which news organizations they are targeting.  “The more you can be targeted, the more you can be effective,” she said.  Assist reporters by providing factual information with credible sources, understanding deadlines and knowing what beats they cover.

Nancy Marshall-Genzer is a senior reporter for the Washington bureau of Marketplace.  Previously, she worked as a newscaster for NPR and WAMC in Albany, New York, as well as an anchor at Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Nancy reminded the audience that “the early bird gets the worm.”  Send pitches with plenty of lead time and plan events around days when journalists may not be as busy.  Mondays, Fridays and holidays work best.  Marketplace will generally be seeking out stories during these times.

Greg Ip

Greg Ip

Greg Ip is U.S. Economics Editor for The Economist and also contributes to The Economist’s blog Free Exchange.  Before joining The Economist in 2008, he served as chief economics correspondent of the Wall Street Journal and created the paper’s online blog Real Time Economics.

According to Greg, reporters at The Economist are generally looking for experts with deep knowledge about the subjects they are covering.  He suggests inserting your organization into the context of a story.  “Describe why something affects you in a positive or negative way.  Examples are very valuable,” he said.

Jordan Rau

Jordan Rau

Jordan Rau is a reporter for Kaiser Health News.  His KHN stories have been featured in publications such as the Philadelphia Inquirer, as well as news sites including NPR.org and MSNBC.com.  Prior to joining Kaiser Health News, he covered government and health care politics for the Los Angeles Times, Newsday and the Concord Monitor.

When it comes to public relations, Jordan recommends focusing on “people, data and dish.”  Find people who are affected by the issue your organization is concerned about and truly illustrate the story.  Provide quantifiable data which can easily be used in a story.  Finally, don’t be afraid to dish out information about your competitors.  “Some of the most successful people in public relations are the experts in opposition research,” he said.  Pitches that suggest conflict with competitors often get more attention than stories that highlight your organization’s own products, services or success.


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